The Depression Rhetoric amongst Pakistani Women

Today I came across an article in Dawn, which listed an alarming statistic i.e.: 34% people in Pakistan are fighting depression as opposed to the world average which is 20%. The Pakistan Medical Association has highlighted depression as the theme for this year’s World Health Day.

I have more of a personal interest in mental healthcare – especially depression – and because I identify as Continue reading “The Depression Rhetoric amongst Pakistani Women”

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An Informed Pakistani – and Proud

When I was younger, I hated everything that came with culture. I didn’t like the food, the clothes, the colour, the traditions, the quirks – just everything that came with being Pakistani. I struggled to reconcile the place I was in to the place where I came from. I can safely say that in retrospect, my adolescence was Continue reading “An Informed Pakistani – and Proud”

PSA: The Desi Muslim Prejudice

“She wears a scarf on her head. Ofcourse she’s more religious than you.”

“She wears a scarf on her head but she was speaking to a guy? She’s going to go burn in hell.”

“Is that how she’s dressed?! But isn’t she a Pakistani? Gosh, her parents must be liberals.”

“Oh my God hasn’t anyone taught her that if even an inch of your hair shows through your scarf – you’re not a Muslim and you don’t know how to practise your religion?” (aka burning in hell)

“She’s a Muslim but she doesn’t wear the hijab, so obviously she is not as close to her deen.”

Have I sufficiently prefaced this yet? Continue reading “PSA: The Desi Muslim Prejudice”

A Tale of Personal Identity

She thought back to the little 11 year old who wouldn’t have recognised the 21 year old she was to become. This woman was too – too Pakistani. She brought so much culture with her, yet at the same time retaining traces of the “Western” environment that was part of her formative years. Perhaps that is a given, because Continue reading “A Tale of Personal Identity”

You Can’t Take The Brains Out of the Beauty

I rarely put forth my thoughts on the backward traditions and conservatism of traditional South Asian/Pakistani patriarchal societies simply because I try to make this space a positive one. But in truth, a facet to positive change is through a healthy form of discussion by acknowledging the problems that prevail and by actively looking for solutions. I am aware that that requires a certain level of humbleness and open mindedness, which unfortunately many people lack, either because of Continue reading “You Can’t Take The Brains Out of the Beauty”

The Friday Post #5

FriYAY! Normally I jump right into it but I don’t know why I’m kinda pumped about today. Maybe it’s got something to do with the pasta and brownies I’ll be making later? (we try to be healthy, I promise). Get your doodh patti (milk tea for my non-desi people) and lets get on with it shall we? Continue reading “The Friday Post #5”

The FRIDAY Post #4

A bit of a rollercoaster week, this one. Started off terribly but ended alright. The weather is getting worse day by day – summer has officially begun its awful tirade. I wonder what it’d be like living Continue reading “The FRIDAY Post #4”

The FRIDAY Post #2

Continue reading “The FRIDAY Post #2”

A Woman’s Choice Is Not An Option

Whenever we come across situations where bigotry, discrimination, or any form of injustice towards minorities is present, we are usually quick to say that the people that hold these thoughts are Continue reading “A Woman’s Choice Is Not An Option”

REVIEW: Salt and Saffron by Kamila Shamsie

 Genre: History, Diasporic Fiction